Treatment descriptions ?>

Treatment descriptions

Aromatherapy


Aromatherapy dates back to ancient Egypt, where plants and flowers were distilled to extract their essential oils. In the early 20th century a French chemist and perfumer, Rene Gattefosse, badly burned his hand whilst working in his laboratory.

In an attempt to cool the burn he plunged his hand into a vat of lavender essential oil that was waiting to be used in perfume. To Gattefosse’s astonishment, he found that the burn healed extremely quickly, without blistering or scarring, and he then went on to research the healing properties of other plants.

During the Second World War Jean Valnet, a French doctor, used essential oils to treat the wounds of the soldiers. A French biochemist, Marguerite Maury, further developed the idea, using essential oils as an integral part of healing massage.

How does it work?

Human beings can distinguish up to 10,000 different smells – some delightful and others nauseating. It is believed that smells enter through the cilla – the fine hairs which line the nose – and then go on to the limbic system, the part of the brain that controls our moods, emotions, memory and learning.

Each essential oil from a flower, plant, root, leaf or piece of bark contains up to one hundred different chemical components (including esters, ketones, aldehydes and terpenes) which can have a strong effect on the whole person. For example, research has shown that the smell of lavender increases alpha waves in the back of the head, producing relaxation. The smell of jasmine increases beta waves in the front of the head, producing sensations of being more alert.

What does it involve?

An aromatherapy consultation will begin with the practitioner finding out about your medical history and what you would like the therapy to achieve for you. On the basis of the information you provide, the practitioner will then mix a recipe of essential oils, which is individually designed to suit your needs.

The recipe can contain anything from four to eight different essential oils, and the practitioner will usually add three of four drops of each one to a carrier oil (normally sweet almond oil or something similar). You will be asked to undress and lie on a treatment couch whilst the massage is carried out. Therapists are particularly sensitive to their clients’ need for modesty and the client is always covered with sheets or towels throughout the massage, which are removed only over the small portion of skin on which the therapist intends to work. Aromatherapy oils do not have to be used on the skin to be effective. Instead, they can be burned in an oil diffuser (a small china pot The recipe can contain anything from four to eight different essential oils which has a space for a tea candle underneath and a flat area on top for warm water to which a few drops of oil are added). The candle warms the oil and water and releases the fragrance into the room. Essential oils can also be diluted in water and sprayed into the air, or a couple of drops can be poured onto a tissue or cotton wool and tucked under your pillow whilst you sleep.

What is it good for?

Aromatherapy can be used for a variety of physical and emotional problems including stress, anxiety, depression, fatigue, pain, insomnia, coughs and colds, burns, scar tissue, digestive problems, and skin disorders.

What are the benefits?

Clients report that the process of having a gentle massage with aromatherapy oils is a wonderfully relaxing and soothing experience. Depending on an individual’s needs, essential oils can be used to soothe, uplift, energize, relax or stimulate.

What are the side effects and when should it be avoided?

Some essential oils must be strictly avoided during pregnancy, if you are epileptic, have high blood pressure or sensitive skin or intend to go into strong sunshine after applying the oils. Because of this it is vital that you consult a qualified practitioner who will take your specific needs into account before creating a recipe of oils for use on your skin. Essential oils are very strong and can cause severe irritation unless they are diluted in a carrier oil. They should never be applied to any part of the skin unless diluted first, and they should never be taken internally.

 

Chakra Balancing


At the central core of our body spin, seven main wheel-like energy centers are called chakras. Chakras have the ability to receive, assimilate and transmit energy.

Each chakra is a vortex, spinning life-force energy into or out of the body. In fact, the word chakra is from the Sanskrit word meaning ‘wheel of light’.

There are 7 major chakras connected to and a part of the physical body. All are located on the torso and head. Each chakra transmits and receives life-force energy often called ‘chi’, ‘qi’, ‘prana’, or ‘universal intelligence’. There are also many minor chakras, most of which are located at the joints of the physical body.

When we are in a state of ill health, the chakras may be distorted, out of alignment, or even stagnant. When this happens, life force energy cannot flow in and out freely and the physical body may suffer. Stress, inability to express emotions, beliefs incongruent with Truth, disconnection from a higher power, unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, exposure to toxicity, etc. can cause the chakra system to close down.

Each chakra resonates with a particular frequency of vibration and are an integral part of vibrational medicine. Chakras are balanced by inviting them back to their natural state of vibration & frequency.

The physical body is a unit made of many different integral parts that are designed to be self-correcting. The body’s job is to maintain balance and the free flow of energy. The chakras are an energetic gateway, feeding the body pranic energy and providing an outlet for the release and dispersal of spent energy.

The tools most commonly used to balance the chakras are:

Color
Crystals & Gems
Light
Sound
Subtle Aromatherapy
Sacred Geometry
Touch Therapies

Crystal Healing

Crystals have long been powerful spiritual symbols and, today, the effects they can have on people are starting to be harnessed to treat illnesses. Practitioners believe that crystals focus the healing energy or ‘life force’ and, as such, crystal therapy can be used either to treat specific ailments or for more general healing.

How does it work?
Crystals have a perfect hexagonal molecular structure that causes them to vibrate at a constant rate. This is what makes them such good components in many modern technological items such as watches and computers. It is thought that, when placed close to specific organs or energy points within the body, crystals will activate a vibrational response that initiates the process of balancing and harmonizing.

It is thought that specific types of crystals are best able to treat specific organs or parts of the body. For example, amazonite is used to calm the nervous system and strengthen the heart; dioptase is used to soothe ulcers and nervous stomach; fluorite is thought to strengthen teeth and bones; hematite activates the spleen and increases resistance to stress; jade works on the kidneys and immune system.

What does it involve?
Generally, the client, fully dressed, lies on a massage table whilst the therapist lays on the body various patterns and combinations of crystals. The pattern and the types of crystals used will depend on the individual needs of the client. One person, for example, might have a quartz crystal placed on the crown of the head, a piece of lapis lazuli on the brow, another quartz crystal on the throat and two rose quartz crystals on the heart area.

Another client might have, for example, pieces of fluorite laid out in a line along the vertebrae with rose quartz crystals set out on each foot. The intricate patterns used are intended to activate the body’s energy points. It is thought this allows the crystal energy to reach every level – physical, emotional, mental and spiritual – harmonising and healing where appropriate.

In addition, the therapist may also help the client to choose a crystal to take away. The crystal, which is usually carried in a pocket or worn as a piece of jewellery, is selected to encourage the body to continue healing and balancing after the healing session.

What is it good for?
Crystal healing can be used for a variety of physical ailments including, for example, migraines, digestive problems and low energy. In addition, crystal healing is often used to help mental and emotional issues such as tension, stress, depression and anxiety.

What are the benefits?
Most crystal therapists aim to treat their clients holistically, taking into account all of the individual’s physical, mental and emotional needs. Most clients report that a crystal healing session is very calming and relaxing.

 

Deep Tissue Massage

Deep Tissue Massage is a massage technique that focuses on the deeper layers of muscle tissue. It aims to release the chronic patterns of tension in the body through slow strokes and deep finger pressure on the contracted areas, either following or going across the fiber’s of the muscles, tendons and fascia.

Deep tissue massage is used to release chronic muscle tension through slower strokes and more direct deep pressure or friction applied across the grain of the muscles not with the grain. Deep tissue massage helps to break up and eliminate scar tissue. Deep tissue massage usually focuses on more specific areas and may cause some soreness during or right after the massage. However, if the massage is done correctly you should feel better than ever within a day or two.

Why get a Deep Tissue Massage?
It feels good and it is beneficial to your health. When muscles are stressed, they block oxygen and nutrients, leading to inflammation that builds up toxins in the muscle tissue. A deep-tissue massage helps loosen muscle tissues, release toxins from muscles and get blood and oxygen circulating properly. Because many toxins are released, it’s important to drink plenty of water after a deep-tissue session to help eliminate these toxins from the body.

What is the purpose of Deep Tissue Massage?
The purpose is to ‘unstick’ the fibers of a muscle while releasing deeply-held patterns of tension, removing toxins, while relaxing and soothing the muscle. It is both corrective and therapeutic.

 

 

Indian Head Massage


Indian head massage is based on the Ayurvedic system of healing which has been practiced in India for over a thousand years. It provides Indian families with relaxation and healing on a daily basis, as well as playing a part in rituals such as weddings and births, not to mention everyday events like a trip to the barber.
How does it work?

The aim of Indian head massage is to release the stress that has accumulated in the tissues, muscles and joints of the head, face, neck and shoulders.

What does it involve?

The client, fully clothed, sits in a massage chair for the treatment. The therapist uses a range of different movements including application of deep kneading and compression movements over the neck, shoulder and scalp areas. In addition, the therapist will also gently stimulate and stroke pressure points on the face. The session will usually last from twenty to forty-five minutes, and most therapists like their clients to sit quietly for ten or twenty minutes once the massage has been completed.

What is it good for?

Indian head massage is especially good for relieving stress, tension, fatigue, insomnia, headaches, migraine, and sinusitis. Clients report that the experience is deeply calming and relaxing, leaving them feeling energized and revitalized and better able to concentrate.

What are the benefits?

Indian head massage helps increase joint mobility and flexibility in the neck and shoulders, improves blood circulation and lymphatic flow, frees knots of muscular tension, relaxes connective tissue, and aids in the elimination of accumulated toxins and waste products. It is particularly good for reducing the effects of stress and tension.

What are the side effects and when should it be avoided?

Following treatment, some clients experience tiredness, dizziness, an increased desire to urinate (as the body eliminates toxins and waste materials), or aching muscles. All of these side effects usually last for no more than a few hours, after which clients generally experience increased energy and alertness. Indian head massage should be avoided if you have had recent surgery, or a head or neck injury; a history of thrombosis or embolism; spondylitis, or spondylosis. If you have high or low blood pressure, diabetes, Indian head massage is particularly good for reducing the effects of stress and tension epilepsy, any kind of heart condition, cancer, or osteoporosis, talk to your doctor before arranging a treatment. Always make sure that you avoid alcohol for at least five hours before the treatment.

 

Lymphatic Drainage Massage 


Developed in the 1930s, lymphatic drainage is a delicate form of massage that stimulates the body’s lymphatic system, improving the metabolism, helping the body to eliminate waste and toxins, and providing a boost to the immune system.

How does it work?

The lymphatic system is responsible for helping fluid and waste leave the body and for regulating the immune system. When the lymphatic system becomes blocked, fluid builds up and stagnates, causing the entire system to become toxic, making us feel sluggish and more susceptible to viral or contagious diseases.

By stimulating this system through massage, it works more efficiently, which in turn boosts the immune system, clears blockages, eliminates toxins, transports nutrients to cells, and increases metabolism.

 

What does it involve?

Lymphatic drainage is essentially a form of massage carried out by a specialist practitioner. The first session involves a consultation to determine the client’s needs and, at that point, the number and frequency of future sessions is decided upon. Unlike some other forms of massage, lymphatic drainage utilizes a very light pressure combined with soft pumping movements in the direction of the lymph nodes. The process can take anywhere from 30 minutes with the masseur concentrating on a localized area, to two hours when working on the whole body.

What is it good for?

Lymphatic drainage massage is especially useful for individuals who seem to suffer regularly from common illnesses like colds and flu. It is also recommended for people who lead sedentary lifestyles, or those who want to reduce puffiness or swelling. It has been cited as having a positive effect on problem skin, cellulite, dysfunctional respiratory systems and people with low energy.

What are the benefits?

Lymphatic drainage massage boosts the immune system so, as well as helping the body ward off illness, treatment can facilitate general feelings of health and vitality. It also has a positive physical effect, improving the appearance of the skin and reducing puffiness caused by water retention, poor circulation, or pregnancy. As with other massages, it can help with pain from fractures and sprains, and rheumatism, and it promotes the body’s own healing mechanisms. Lymphatic drainage massage utilizes very light pressure.

What are the side effects and when should it be avoided?

Lymphatic drainage should not be used by people with acute inflammation, malignant tumors, thrombosis, or major heart problems. Because of its effect on the immune system, people with cancer, diabetes, thyroid or kidney problems, asthma, or epilepsy should seek medical advice before treatment. It is also advisable that women do not undergo lymphatic drainage while menstruating.

 

Reflexology


Reflexology, which has its roots in ancient Egypt, according to cave paintings, works on the principle that every organ and system of the body has a corresponding point or zone in the feet. For example, the spot in the centre of the big toe corresponds to the pituitary gland, and on the ball of the foot underneath the big toe, there is a point that corresponds to the thyroid and parathyroid glands.

How does it work?

A reflexology practitioner uses light pressure to massage each of the points in the toes, feet and ankles to release tension, remove energy blockages, disperse accumulations of calcium and uric acid, stimulate blood circulation and promote healing of both body and mind.

What does it involve?

The practitioner will begin by taking details of the client’s medical history and lifestyle. The client will be asked to remove only their footwear. The client, fully clothed apart from their feet, will lie on a massage couch whilst the practitioner works on their feet and ankles.

Gentle pressure is applied to each pressure point and, where there are corresponding physical problems, the client may experience some slight discomfort and/or the therapist may feel some blockages in the area. For example, when the practitioner touches the reflex point that corresponds to the gall bladder, if the client has a problem with that organ, then some discomfort may be felt in the foot.

Generally, most clients report that a reflexology treatment is wonderfully relaxing and soothing, and many people fall asleep. Each session will last about an hour and, in most cases, a series of sessions are necessary to resolve any problems. Some clients book a regularly weekly or monthly session as a preventative measure, to keep their systems balanced and in good working order.

What is it good for?

Reflexology can be used to treat a wide range of disorders including skin and respiratory conditions, migraine, PMS and menopausal problems, chronic fatigue, stress, depression and anxiety.

What are the benefits?

Reflexology can be used both to help with conditions such as, for example, eczema, bronchitis or insomnia for which the client is seeking immediate treatment; or it can be used to keep the body’s energy flowing and the mind in balance.

What are the side effects and when should it be avoided?

Reflexology should be avoided during the fist three months of pregnancy. As part of the balancing process, some clients find that reflexology encourages the elimination of toxins from the body. Therefore, as this could interfere with any medication you are taking, it is very important to inform the practitioner of any medicinal treatment you are receiving.

Also, be sure to tell the Reflexology practitioner if you have a pacemaker, kidney stones or gallstones. If you have a health problem such as high blood pressure, thyroid disease or diabetes; or you have a foot injury, phlebitis, thrombosis or blood clots, have a chat with your doctor before booking a reflexology session.

Some clients report that, immediately after a reflexology treatment, they feel very relaxed and sleepy and just want to go home and lie down. Reflexology is suitable for everyone, except those people who dislike having their feet touched.

Reiki

The word Reiki means ‘universal life energy’ in Japanese, where this therapy originated at the turn of the century. Reiki is based on the premise that illness is caused by a disruption in the body’s energy field or life force. By using specially designed symbols and channeling energy, it is believed that the body can be filled with positive energy causing the disease-making negative energy to disappear.

How does it work?
Reiki heals by charging negatively affected parts of the energy field with positive energy. Energy fields in the body each have different vibratory levels and reiki practitioners use their hands to affect and hopefully rebalance these vibrations in the negatively affected part of the body.

What does it involve?
Although the Reiki practitioner may ask questions about the client’s health prior to treatment, it is important to note that no diagnosis, prognosis or advice will be offered. Remaining fully clothed, the client prepares for treatment by relaxing on a massage couch or sitting if that is more comfortable.

The practitioner may then rest their hands lightly and gently on the body in a sequence of positions, each one being held for a couple of minutes.

Alternatively, they may work ‘absently’, or away from the body. Although personal experiences differ, some people report feeling intense heat from the practitioner’s hands during the process. The client does not have to think about or do anything, as it is the practitioner’s aim to provide a gentle, warming, vital energy appropriate for the recipient.

What is it good for?
Reiki can be used to relieve the symptoms of chronic illnesses such as anxiety, insomnia, back pain, and arthritis, and it often produces long-term beneficial changes. In most cases, the practitioner will suggest a course of four, six, or twelve treatments for maximum benefit.

What are the benefits?
Aside from treating physical, mental, and emotional problems, most clients report that a reiki treatment feels wonderful, and promotes a sense of relaxation and well-being.

What are the side effects and when should it be avoided?
As a general rule, reiki can’t do any harm because it is a form of non-invasive energy healing and will adjust itself to create the most appropriate effect for each individual person. However, although most people feel peaceful and relaxed after treatment, it can stir up emotions as part of the healing process. Some people also experience a healing reaction such as a headache or flulike symptoms, but any discomfort should be short-lived.

 

Sports Massage


Sports massage is based on Swedish massage, a technique that uses the application of pressure to manipulate soft tissue. Swedish massage was developed in the 1700s by Per Henrik Ling, a Swedish physiologist and fencing master, and involves the use of gliding strokes, kneading movements, circular pressure of the hand and fingers, vibratory movements, brisk tapping and bending and stretching.

Sports massage incorporates all of these Swedish massage movements, together with additional intensive techniques that are specifically designed to prevent and treat sports injuries.

How does it work?

Sports massage aims to improve the suppleness and flexibility of muscles and joints, improve blood circulation, speed up the healing of damaged or stressed muscles, tissues and joints, and prevent future muscle and tendon injuries.

A sports massage can be carried out prior to a sports event, when it will stimulate circulation, calm nervous tension and prepare the individual for optimal performance whilst at the same time reducing the risk of injury. It can be carried out after a sports event, when it will relieve soreness and assist with the removal of lactic acid and other waste products. It is often used during training, when the practitioner will focus on speeding up the healing of existing injuries and preventing the development of future injuries.

What does it involve?

The client is usually asked to remove their outer layer of clothing so that the practitioner can work directly onto the skin. The massage is carried out whilst the client is lying on a massage couch or table and, depending on whether it is pre-event, post-event or a training massage, the therapy can take from thirty minutes to two hours.

What is it good for?

Sports massage is good for releasing muscle tension and restoring balance to the musculoskeletal system. It reduces strain and discomfort caused by training or participating in sport, and it encourages the body to heal and repair any injuries sustained.

What are the benefits?

The main benefit of sports massage is that it improves muscle flexibility, blood circulation and reduces swelling, aids the prevention of sports injuries and assists the body with recovery and repair after sports injuries have been sustained.

What are the side effects and when should it be avoided?

Sports massage, although relaxing and soothing, can also be quite vigorous. If the client has muscle soreness the massage may, initially, cause some discomfort. Sports massage should be avoided if you have open wounds, muscle tears, sprained ligaments or burns; varicose veins, phlebitis, thrombosis, cancer, tumours, melanoma or haemophilia. This therapy is also unsuitable for anyone with infectious skin disease such as a fungal infection or herpes. People with diabetes should be aware that sports massage will have the same effects as exercise.

Thai Massage


The traditional healing massage of Thailand (commonly known as Thai massage) originated in India during the Buddha’s lifetime, over 2500 years ago. As Buddhism spread from India, so did this form of healing massage. Monks in Thailand originally used this therapy as one element of their healing practices, which consisted of dietary advice, the use of herbs, meditation, and what we now call Thai massage. This form of massage involves manipulation using stretching techniques and gentle pressure along the meridians or energy lines of the body.

How does it work?

The aim of Thai massage is to release toxins and waste materials from the joints, muscles and connective tissue, and stimulate internal organs by gentle pressure on specific energy points.

What does it involve?

Thai massage is carried out on a mat or thin mattress, which is laid out on the floor. The therapist uses both their hands and feet to apply pressure to the client’s fully-clothed body and to carry out a range of gentle stretching movements.

The therapist focuses on the client’s energy lines (which, in this therapy are called shen), with the aim of unblocking stagnant and trapped energy, stimulating specific energy points and encouraging the body’s own life force (or chi) to flow freely and easily. Thai massage is normally carried out in silence as, for the therapist, the giving of the massage is an important meditative and spiritual practice.

During the massage the client, whilst being manipulated gently and respectfully, is given the opportunity to look within and focus on the healing experience. A Thai massage can last for up to two hours and clients are advised to wear loose, comfortable clothes.

What is it good for?

Thai massage helps to relieve tension within the body and can be effectively used for pain relief. It improves the function of the lymph glands and blood circulation, balances the nervous system and clears out blocked and stagnant energy. It is appropriate for a range of musculoskeletal problems including back, neck, shoulder, hip and leg pain.

What are the benefits?

This form of massage is especially good for releasing stress and tension and encouraging relaxation of both mind and body. Clients report that Thai massage is wonderfully soothing and relaxing and leaves them feeling energized, refreshed, and with a deep sense of well-being.

What are the side effects and when should it be avoided?

Thai massage is suitable for everyone, including the very young and the very elderly. However, it should be avoided if you have osteoporosis or very brittle bones; spinal fusions or artificial hip, knee or elbow joints; phlebitis, hemophilia, or lymphatic cancer. If you have high blood pressure or heart problems, talk to your doctor before booking a treatment.